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Fall 2017

MATH 573. Graph Theory.

Credit Hours: 
3
Semester Offered: 
Comments From Graduate Director: 
Graph Theory is one of the areas represented in Discrete Mathematics, and has grown over the last thirty years to become an important area in both pure and applied mathematics (e.g. computer science, statistics, and operations research). We regularly offer doctoral-level courses in graph theory, for which this course would be prerequisite and Ph.D. students can make a minor area out of Math 573 and Math 773 or some other 700-level discrete math course. In the spring Math 573 follows with Math 571 Combinatorics, and taking both courses will provide a good background in discrete mathematics. Both courses are offered annually.

MATH 567. Advanced Calculus. I.

Credit Hours: 
3
Semester Offered: 
Comments From Graduate Director: 
This is a course in mathematical methods, aimed primarily at engineering and science graduate students. Can be used to meet requirements in Option B (Industrial/Applied Mathematics) of the M.S. program, or as an elective in other options. This course continues with Math 568 in the spring, which primarily covers complex variables and applications from an engineering mathematics perspective.

MATH 563. Mathematics Modeling.

Credit Hours: 
3
Semester Offered: 
Comments From Graduate Director: 
This course will give the student some exposure to how mathematics is used to analyze problems arising in real-world applications in industry and science. It is a required course in Option B of the M.S. program. It has been run on a yearly basis, concurrently with Math 464. Students will need a basic undergraduate background in the areas of differential equations and probability and statistics, and basic knowledge of computing software such as Excel or Matlab.

MATH 551. Real Variables 1.

Credit Hours: 
3
Semester Offered: 
Comments From Graduate Director: 
This is the first semester of a basic graduate two-semester course (551/651) in real analysis. Real analysis is one of the areas of the M.S. Advanced Exams/Ph.D. entrance exams and the full-year sequence should be taken if preparing for the exam. It is a prerequisite for the doctoral sequence in functional analysis and other doctoral-level courses in analysis and applied mathematics. You should have a good background in advanced calculus (Math 451 at least) before taking this class. The first semester is largely devoted to developing Lebesgue measure. Math 651, Real Variables II, is offered in the spring.

MATH 545. Number Theory 1.

Credit Hours: 
3
Semester Offered: 
Comments From Graduate Director: 
This course is offered about every other year and provides a graduate-level introduction to Number Theory. Depending on interest, there is sometimes a second semester of Number Theory, Math 645, offered in the spring.

MATH 541. Modern Algebra 1.

Credit Hours: 
3
Semester Offered: 
Comments From Graduate Director: 
This is the basic graduate course in algebra. Note that algebra is one of the areas of the M.S. Advanced Exams/Ph.D. entrance exams. Math 541 follows in the spring with a second semester, Math 641, and both courses are needed if you are taking the exam. Math 541 is a basic prerequisite for advanced courses in combinatorics, graph theory, and number theory. It is a popular course for first year M.S. students and for first year Ph.D. students who expect to take the Entrance Exam in that area.

MATH 521. Numerical Analysis.

Credit Hours: 
3
Syllabus: 
Semester Offered: 
Comments From Graduate Director: 
This is a standard graduate course covering fundamentals of numerical analysis. A previous numerical analysis course is not required but computer programming is necessary (see instructor if you have questions about prerequisites). If you’re interested in applied mathematics, this is a fundamental course to take. It follows in the spring with Math 522, a course in numerical methods for partial differential equations.

MATH 465. Partial Differential Equations.

Credit Hours: 
3
Semester Offered: 
Comments From Graduate Director: 
This is an undergraduate course in partial differential equations which in most cases does not count toward M.S. program requirements. However, if you have never seen partial differential equations before, particularly if you are in Option B or are interested in applied mathematics, you might wish to take this course.

MATH 451. Introduction-Real Analysis 1.

Credit Hours: 
3
Semester Offered: 
Comments From Graduate Director: 
Standard senior-level undergraduate course in advanced calculus. This course is taken by M.S. students who have not had a previous course in advanced calculus. Math 451 follows in the spring with Math 452. Depending on the outcome of the Basic Exam, if you are a new M.S. student you may be asked or required to take this course. In most cases Math 451 does not count toward M.S. program requirements, but Math 452 does count toward credit requirements. Math 451 is a prerequisite for graduate analysis courses, including real variables, Math 551, and complex analysis, Math 555, and provides important background for courses such as Math 564, Differential Equations. All M.S. students must complete, with a B average, either the Math 451/452 sequence, or Math 551.

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